'Hop Shoots' Vegetable Grown By Farmer In Bihar Sells For Rupees 1 Lakh Per Kg, IAS Officer Calls it 'Game Changer'

Amresh Singh, hailing from Karamdih village in Aurangabad district of Bihar, has spent Rs. 2.5 lakh for growing hop shoots, a plant commonly seen within the international vegetable market and sold for around 1, 85,000 rupees for 1 kg of vegetable.

'Hop Shoots' Vegetable Grown By Farmer In Bihar Sells For Rupees 1 Lakh Per Kg, IAS Officer Calls it 'Game Changer'
This Vegetable Grown By Farmer In Bihar Sells For Rupees 1 Lakh Per Kg

Indian farmers are increasingly taking new risks in agriculture and with new crop varieties readily available with modernization methods, farmers aren't averse to using them to extend productivity and within the process both are earning quite before.A farmer from Bihar has also taken a risk and is now growing the world's costliest vegetable in his backyard.

 Amresh Singh, hailing from Karamdih village in Aurangabad district of Bihar, has spent Rs. 2.5 lakh for growing hop shoots, a plant commonly seen within the international vegetable market and sold for around 1, 85,000 rupees for 1 kg of vegetable. Amresh is growing vegetables in five katthas of his land and has not used any chemical fertilizers or pesticides within the hope of accelerating productivity and increasing income on the crop. Amresh, who grew vegetables on an attempt basis on his land, told The New Indian Express that a minimum of 60 percent of vegetable cultivation has been done effectively.

Agricultural scientist at the Indian Botanical Research Institute of Varanasi, Dr. Under the guidance of Lal and Amaresh, the Hop Shoot, scientifically referred to as Humus-Lupulus, is cultivated and Amaresh reportedly brings plants for cultivation. The flowers of the plant, referred to as hop-cones or strobiles, are used as a stabilizing agent in beer making. Other parts of the plant like twigs are used for food and medicine.Senior bureaucrat Supriya Sahu was among several social media users who shared Amresh's story, praising him for his innovation and thinking that other farmers could also cultivate crops for better earnings.