Canada's premiers to PM Justin Trudeau that they have the capacity to vaccinate Canadians faster 

Government numbers show Canada had received nearly 425,000 doses of the Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines as of Dec. 31

Canada's premiers to PM Justin Trudeau that they have the capacity to vaccinate Canadians faster 
Justin Trudeau

During what participants described as a positive meeting, Canada's premiers told Prime Minister Justin Trudeau tonight that they need the capacity to vaccinate Canadians faster than they're immediately and that they need the federal to intensify its delivery of vaccines to match their quickening pace.

The premiers made their push for more doses during a call with Trudeau earlier tonight that also touched on developments within the new testing regime for international travellers.Sources have told CBC News that the Quebec government is arguing it can administer more doses during a week that it'll receive from the federal during the whole month of January.

Data released by the provinces show that only about half the vaccines they've received are administered to Canadians, although the pace of immunization by provincial health agencies is learning daily.

"We are concerned that as we devour the pace of inoculation, supply are going to be inadequate and i have heard other premiers express an equivalent concerns," Alberta Premier Jason Kenney said after the meeting. "I have conveyed to the prime minister, as have my colleagues, the urgency of getting the maximum amount supply here as we possibly can."

Government numbers show Canada had received nearly 425,000 doses of the -BioNTech vaccines as of Dec. 31. Roughly 195,000 Canadians had received shots as of Wednesday, consistent with an estimate by a gaggle of academics and data analysts  well below 1 per cent of the country's population.

New Brunswick Premier Blaine Higgs said the tone of the decision tonight was courteous and every one the premiers involved more doses. They also agreed, he said, that the various levels of state have worked well together since the start of the pandemic.

"There was some accusations going back and forth earlier within the week and that is unfortunate, really, because i feel we all recognize that the blame game isn't getting to help anyone here," Higgs told CBC News Network's Power & Politics after the meeting."The point was that we've to only slave and find out how can we work with what we've and the way can we work together to urge more," he added.