Charlotte Bellis : Family, Net Worth, Parents, Husband, Children and Wikipedia

Charlotte Bellis is a very famous and controversial journalist at the news channel named Al Jazeera English know all about her in this article as like her Family, Net Worth, Parents, Husband, Children and Wikipedia

  Bio
Name Charlotte Bellis
Birthdate ( Age) 5 may 1986
Place of Birth Christchurch, New Zealand
Nationality New Zealand
Marital Status  Not Known
Husband/Partner Not Known
Children Not Known
Education University of Missouri-Columbia
Father Bruce
Mother Barbara Bellis
Profession Journalist
Net Worth $1 million ( estimated )
Last Update August 2021

Charlotte Bellis is a very famous and controversial journalist at the news channel named Al Jazeera English which is a news channel of Qatar, an independent news organisation funded by the Qatari government.

She was born in Christchurch, New Zealand on May 5th, 1986. Get to know more about her in the article below.She was the only female reporter in the room at Taliban’s first press conference.

Early Life and Family

Charlotte Bellis was born on 5th May 1986 in Christchurch, New Zealand. By profession, she is a Journalist at Al Jazeera English. She completes her education at St. Margaret’s College and the University of Missouri. Her father’s name is Bruce and her mother’s name is Barbara Bellis.

Charlotte Bellis Husband

Charlotte Bellis is possible single now and there is no any information available on social media about her marital and relationship status.

Charlotte Bellis Net Worth

Charlotte Bellis is a very famous and controversial journalist at the news channel named Al Jazeera Englishwho has an estimated Net Worth of arround $1 million in 2021. 

Professional Career

Charlotte Bellis working for Al Jazeera in Afghanistan since 2019.She was the only female reporter in the room at Taliban’s first press conference.There was only one female journalist at the Taliban’s first official press conference this week and her bold question to the group of armed men who took over Afghanistan’s capital shocked the world.

Charlotte Bellis Taliban Press Confrance

Charlotte Bellis was the first person in the media scrum sitting before the Taliban on Tuesday to ask a question, her blonde locks peeking out from underneath a face covering.And it centred around how they would respect the rights of thousands of terrified Afghan women.Ms Bellis has worked for Al Jazeera, an independent news organisation funded partly by the Qatari government. The experienced reporter, originally from New Zealand, was the only female journalist allowed to attend the Taliban’s first official press conference. And she didn’t waste the opportunity.

In footage of the tense event Ms Bellis appears calm and measured as she introduces herself to Afghanistan’s new rulers and asks her hard-hitting question.’I want to talk to you about women’s rights and girl’s rights, about whether women will be allowed to work and if girls will still go to school,’ she said. ‘What assurances can you give to women and girls that their rights will be protected?’

Zabiullah Mujahid, a Taliban spokesman at the event, assured reporters that the ‘Islamic Emirate’ would give women their rights as long as they followed Sharia law. ‘Women will be afforded all their rights. Whether it is at work or other activities because women are a key part of society,’ he said.’We are guaranteeing all their rights within the limits of Islam.’

Bellis’s pointed question is what thousands of distraught Afghan women have been asking themselves since the Taliban seized control of their homes and lives. Late on Sunday night, rifle-touting insurgents swarmed the presidential palace and declared the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan from the desk of ousted President Ashraf Ghani, who fled the city one day earlier.

The following day, at least eight were killed at Kabul’s Hamid Karzai airport including two who were shot dead by US troops, three who were run over by taxiing jets and three stowaways who fell from the fuselage of an airborne C-17 US Air Force plane.

Chilling reports out of Kabul claimed militants were going door-to-door trying to track down locals accused of helping Western forces during the Afghanistan War and subsequent 20-year intervention from the US, Britain and Australia.

Reports also claimed Taliban gangs were hunting for girls as young as 12 for sex slaves, reminiscent of the violence women and young girls experienced almost 20 years ago during their previous Islamist regime. Women and female children were previously locked inside their homes and forbidden to leave for education or work, the Australian reported.

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